American catch greenberg paul. Book Review: 'American Catch' by Paul Greenberg 2019-01-25

American catch greenberg paul Rating: 9,1/10 361 reviews

AMERICAN CATCH by Paul Greenberg

american catch greenberg paul

This was a really enlightening book, especially the chapter about oysters. Farther south, a different catastrophe threatens another seafood-rich environment. I have to carefully examine my fish purchases, because many grocery stores stock fish that's not sustainable. Asian farmed shrimp—cheap, abundant, and a perfect vehicle for the frying and sauces Americans love—have flooded the American market. There are other examples of barriers to sustainable shrimp and salmon fishing as well.

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American Catch by Paul Greenberg (ebook)

american catch greenberg paul

The stuff we bring into the country is very often farmed. While oil spills and mining and poor sewage systems of course are a major factor in the rather abysmal state of our waterways, the major culprit of a struggling once core industry is the American consumer. In the 1920s, the average New Yorker ate six hundred local oysters a year. With American Catch, Paul Greenberg proposes a way to break the current destructive patterns of consumption and return American catch back to American eaters. This happened because apparently 40% of the book is endnotes, which is neither here nor there but does say something about a book's construction and documentation. It's presented in 3 sections meant to show U.

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american catch greenberg paul

In the 1920s, the average New Yorker ate six hundred local oysters a year. And so when we fashion our narratives it is with Pollyanna on our shoulders. American Catch examines New York oysters, Gulf shrimp, and Alaskan salmon to reveal how it came to be that 91 percent of the seafood Americans eat is foreign. There is a lot of information in here that most people already know, but it was instructive to have it all assembled in one place - and there's also a lot of new information I learned. It doesn't focus on just one geographic area, instead showing that our abuse of seafood truly is a national problem, from New York to Louisiana to Alaska, and that we need to consider the bigger picture of how we view seafood if we're going to fix it. Bizarrely, during that same period, our seafood exports quadrupled.

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Listen to American Catch by Paul Greenberg at myrenault.com.br

american catch greenberg paul

Having lost their market share to the bargain-basement prices offered by foreign aquaculture, American fishermen can no longer compete. Genres: Browser Compatibility Our audio books and Chrome aren't playing nicely right now, but we're on it. For example, while Americans eat more seafood than ever and in fact product a great amount of seafood still, we export the best of what we still produce wild sockeye and import massive quantities of utter crap Chinese farmed tilapia. Greenberg makes a good case for his chief concern: that the lack on appetite literally for wild caught local fish leads Americans to be careless about the health of the ecosystems which sustain those fish. A major consequence of this decoupling of locale and diet, and the most interesting part of this story to this political scientist, was the disappearance of a broad constituency in American politics that supported clean, healthy waterways. Unfortunately, it's also deepening my feelings of despair about our current political climate and values.

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American Catch by Paul Greenberg · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

american catch greenberg paul

Kellogg Foundation Food and Society Policy Fellow, New York's South Street Seaport Museum's Writer-in-Residence and a fellow with the Blue Ocean Institute. I'm lucky to have a wonderful grocer down the street, that sources many different types of wild Alaskan salmon. My only complaints were that the oyster section was so engaging, the others less so, and I would have liked more information about how I as a consumer can help make the change to local seafood. American fishermen and processors could not compete with cheap imported fish. It focuses on oysters, then shrimp, then salmon - putting them in context of health, environment and the economy. Greenberg does do this with shrimp, which prompts an interesting discussion about how their shells affects muscle fiber in a way that contributes to their great mouthfeel possibly the ickiest way to describe taste. The general thesis is that America used to have and in many cases still does have significant seafood resources but we have wasted, destroyed, or ignored them.

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American Catch by Paul Greenberg

american catch greenberg paul

Greenberg tells the story of the ill-impacts of our seafood as a global economy through the history of three American favorites: oysters, salmon, and shrimp. In 2005, the United States imported five billion pounds of seafood, nearly double what we imported twenty years earlier. And surprise, it's wetlands that contribute enormously to the nursery grounds for our seafood. Another fascinating book from Greenberg. Enlisting the consumer as an advocate for expanding the fishing industry on our home turf can make the difference between relative apathy and passionate advocacy. Asian-farmed shrimp—cheap, abundant, and a perfect vehicle for the frying and sauces Americans love—have flooded the American market.

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American Catch: The Fight for Our Local Seafood by Paul Greenberg

american catch greenberg paul

Asian-farmed shrimp—cheap, abundant, and a perfect vehicle for the frying and sauces Americans love—have flooded the American market. In more recent times, I've dragged my boyfriend out on a quest for fried clams because I decided I had to have them right now, and then spent a week in Maine eating sea More reviews available at my blog,. They are tired of global warming, acid rain, the loss of biodiversity, overpopulation and the like. In 2005, the United States imported five billion pounds of seafood, nearly double what we imported twenty years earlier. In return the sea will feed us and make us smarter, healthier, and more resilient. No In the last chapter before his conclusions, Greenberg muses about his task in writing this book. And that's a very, very bad thing.

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American Catch by Paul Greenberg

american catch greenberg paul

Of course, it would have been a sin to cook it all the way through: I like my salmon fairly rare in the center. In New York, Greenberg connects an oyster restoration project with a vision for how the bivalves might save the city from rising tides. Unassuming in appearance and nature, they are little powerhouses of the sea, filtering gallon after gallon of water, providing ideal habitats for other ocean dwellers, and protecting our coastlines from natural disasters and rising sea levels. For example, while Americans eat more seafood than ever and in fact product a great amount of seafood still, we export the best of what we still produce wild sockeye and imp American Catch tells the tragedy, inefficiency, and comedy of the current state of our country's seafood industry by relating the histories of three foods: oysters, shrimp and sockeye salmon. A pristine, productive fishery, Bristol Bay is now at great risk: The proposed Pebble Mine project could under¬mine the very spawning grounds that make this great run possible. He currently lives in New York City In 2011 Greenberg won the James Beard Award for Writing and Literature for Four Fish and he now lectures widely throughout North America. This is a book that makes me increasingly angry with the American proclivity to value price and quantity over quality.

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Listen to American Catch by Paul Greenberg at myrenault.com.br

american catch greenberg paul

Greenberg has been a Literature Fellow, a , and a Food and Society Policy Fellow. From his perspective, the stakes are too high. We can still be self-reliant on our own shores, we just have to educate our citizens that certain foods should not be eaten during all seasons. Of course, hundreds of years of pollution, salt marsh draining, and dredging have completely destroyed this to the point that the few bits of life that still cling are illegal to eat because they are poisoned by their environment. And yet, more than 85% of the seafood we eat is imported. The Washington Post: Americans need to eat more American seafood.

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