Social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony. Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America 2019-03-05

Social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony Rating: 7,5/10 1958 reviews

Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

How and under what conditions might extractive industries effectively stimulate development? Social Conflict and Emergent Institutions: Hypotheses from Piura, Peru Anthony Bebbington 5. . The Political Economy of Managing Extractives in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru Jose Carlos Orihuela and Rosemary Thorp 3. By digging deep into both national and local experiences with extractive industry they demonstrate the ways in which it transforms economies, societies, polities and environments. As the extractive economy has entered another boom period over the last decade, not least in Latin America, the countries in which this boom is occurring are challenged to interpret this ambiguity. Given the scope of these oft-witnessed transformations, extractive activities are commonly viewed with unease as well as expectation-as risky transgressions of the order of things as well as singular opportunities to harness the transformative potential of extraction to spur development processes. They also ask whether the existence of left-of-centre governments in the region changes the relationships between extractive industry and development.

Next

Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

Anthony Bebbington's study of mining conflicts in northern Peru Chapter 4 is among the more optimistic, if cautiously so. The extraction of minerals, oil and gas has a long and ambiguous history in development processes - in North America, Europe, Latin America and Australasia. The contributors are a mixture of geographers, economists, political scientists, development experts and anthropologists, who all draw on sustained field work in the region. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about. Chapter 2 by José Carlos Orihuela and Rosemary Thorp offers a history of extractive economies in the region, from the colonial era to the present. This book speaks directly to this question and to the different ways in which Latin American countries are responding to the challenge of extractive industry. This particular edition is in a Hardcover format.

Next

Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America by Anthony J. Bebbington

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

Extraction has yielded wealth, regional identities and in some cases capital for industrialization. For the most part the findings question the wisdom of the development model that many countries in the region have taken up and which emphasises the productive roles of mining and hydrocarbon industries. They pay particular attention to the social conflict that extraction consistently produces, and they ask how far this conflict might usher in political and institutional changes that could lead to a more productive relationship between extraction and development. Taller sobre Minería y Proyectos Extractivos. We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website.

Next

Social conflict, economic development and extractive industry : evidence from South America

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

The book should be of interest to students and researchers of Development Studies, Geography, Politics and Political Economy, as well as Anthropology. Bebbington Publicado en Neoliberalismo, minería y las luchas por el territorio: Actores, estrategias y alternativas. Will the extractive industry yield, for them, economic development, or will its main gifts be ones of conflict, degradation and unequal forms of growth. Available from: Mineral, oil, and gas extraction are transformative activities. The complex development and welfare challenges in the emerging and underdeveloped economies of Latin America, that have implications for institutional changes, are well presented. This chapter and also Chapter 7 by Denise Humphreys Bebbington, on hydrocarbon expansion in the Bolivian Chaco address the matter of whether the post-neoliberalisms on view in Bolivia and Ecuador have led to more progressive forms of extractive-sector regulation. His chapter serves as a reminder that while conflicts related to extractive industries have proliferated in the Andean-Amazonian region, conflict is not ever-present, and it exists at various levels of intensity.

Next

Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

For the most part the findings question the wisdom of the development model that many countries in the region have taken up and which emphasises the productive roles of mining and hydrocarbon industries. Meticulously documenting the effects mining has on local communities and their struggle for rights, self-determination and compensation, the book makes a significant contribution to understanding the dynamics of mining conflicts in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. They pay particular attention to the social conflict that extraction consistently produces, and they ask how far this conflict might usher in political and institutional changes that could lead to a more productive relationship between extraction and development. In other cases its main heritages have been social conflict, environmental damage and underperforming national economies. In this respect, the book has a relevance that reaches far beyond the Andean-Amazonian region. By digging deep into both national and local experiences with extractive industry they demonstrate the ways in which it transforms economies, societies, polities and environments. They pay particular attention to the social conflict that extraction consistently produces, and they ask how far this conflict might usher in political and institutional changes that could lead to a more productive relationship between extraction and development.

Next

Social Conflict, Economic Development and the Extractive Industry by Anthony Bebbington · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

In other cases its main heritages have been social conflict, environmental damage and underperforming national economies. At one level these debates seem polarized. Extraction has yielded wealth, regional identities and in some cases capital for industrialization. The complex development and welfare challenges in the emerging and underdeveloped economies of Latin America, that have implications for institutional changes, are well presented. In the process, it exemplifies the case of social conflict in South America showing that the same research work can be replicated for other developing and emerging economies of the world.

Next

Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

Designed to respond to mining-related social unrest, these mechanisms for devolving mining rents to producing regions have led to new rounds of conflict over access to, and use of, these fiscal resources. In his conclusion, Anthony Bebbington contends that the book's case studies provide scant evidence that extractive industry expansion has led to sustained economic dynamism in affected territories. For the most part the findings question the wisdom of the development model that many countries in the region have taken up and which emphasises the productive roles of mining and hydrocarbon industries. For the most part the findings question the wisdom of the development model that many countries in the region have taken up and which emphasises the productive roles of mining and hydrocarbon industries. As the extractive economy has entered another boom period over the last decade, not least in Latin America, the countries in which this boom is occurring are challenged to interpret this ambiguity. Summary The extraction of minerals, oil and gas has a long and ambiguous history in development processes — in North America, Europe, Latin America and Australasia. The authors conclude that state capacity to arbitrate conflict and generate institutional change is limited in the region not least because of historically weak state presence in rural areas , though the conditions for the state to assume such a role are probably most favorable in Bolivia, given its longer tradition of state-social movement negotiations.

Next

Social Conflict, Economic Development and Extractive Industry: Evidence from South America (Routledge ISS Studies in Rural Livelihoods) by Anthony Bebbington (9780415620710)

social conflict economic development and the extractive industry bebbington anthony

Household and Community Responses to Mining-Related River Contamination in the Upper Pilcomayo Basin, Bolivia David Preston Part 3: Conclusions and Comparisons 11. The task was to assign the quotations to these politically very different leaders. They pay particular attention to the social conflict that extraction consistently produces, and they ask how far this conflict might usher in political and institutional changes that could lead to a more productive relationship between extraction and development. Will the extractive industry yield, for them, economic development, or will its main gifts be ones of conflict, degradation and unequal forms of growth. The book makes clear the immense difficulties that countries and regional societies face in harnessing extractive industry for the collective good. The book is divided into three main sections.

Next